Clint Eastwood Casts Real-life Heroes For Film About Terror Attack They Thwarted

http://variety.com/2017/film/news/clint-eastwood-casts-real-life-soliders-the-1517-to-paris-1202454678/

Back in 2015, three Americans helped thwart a terrorist attack on a train to Paris.  They were subsequently awarded France’s highest honor.

Clint Eastwood’s next movie, The 15:17 to Paris, is about this incident, and he has cast the real-life heroes in the film.

Variety reports:

In an unconventional move, Clint Eastwood has tapped Anthony Sadler, Alek Skarlatos, and Spencer Stone to play themselves in his next movie, “The 15:17 to Paris.” The film will tell the story of the three Americans who stopped a terrorist on a train bound for Paris.

Jenna Fischer, Judy Greer, and Ray Corasani will also join the real-life heroes in the film. Paul-Mikel Williams, Max Ivutin, Bryce Gheisa, Cole Eichenberger, and William Jennings will play younger versions of the Sadler, Skarlatos and Stone.

The casting move is similar to Eastwood’s “Gran Torino,” which featured an almost-unknown cast outside of Eastwood, who also starred in the movie.

 Following the news that this would be his follow-up to the box office hit “Sully,” Eastwood began a wide-ranging search for the actors who would portray the three Americans. The studio and Eastwood made their choices but at the 11th hour decided to have Sadler, Skarlatos and Stone portray themselves.

Sources say that, while the three will have good-sized roles, the film is expected to begin during their childhood and show their friendship leading up to the moment that changed their lives. That means the roles will not be full-on leads.

Fox News has more on the event that the film will be about: 

The Sacramento-area men were vacationing in Europe when they tackled Ayoub El-Khazzani, a man who authorities said has ties to radical Islam. El-Khazzani had boarded the Paris-bound train with a Kalashnikov rifle, pistol and box cutter.

Skarlatos told Fox News in May about his famed August 2015 brush with terror in Europe, “I still think about it every day. I get nightmares from time to time.”

Looking back on the terror attack that changed his life, Skarlatos recalled, “It was just kind of a gut response. I guess I was just lucky that I was able to do something and not freeze up. That was the biggest thing I was grateful for because when you think about something like that, you never really know how you’re going to react until you actually do and so I was grateful I didn’t just sit there in shock.”

They’re heroes!

(Image Source)

 

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