Missouri Claims Legislative Victory With Constitutional Carry And Voter ID

Missouri Moves To The Right With Constitutional Carry And Voter ID

Missouri is the best example of what can happen to Republicans in an election year. The suddenly become … conservative.

The Missouri legislature has held a Republican super majority for several sessions and has failed to pass a Right To Work law, see any substantial decrease in taxes or decrease  governmental bureaucracy since it gained control.

However, in this election year, the year of the outsider, in a year where it’s clear that voters are fed up with empty promises and no action, this generally conservative state, with a squishy Republican super majority,  just got a little more conservative.

During their yearly veto session, this week, The Missouri legislature managed to overturn two big vetos by Governor, Jay Nixon. … Conditional Carry and Voter ID.

USNews.com reports:

The sweeping guns legislation would allow most adults to carry concealed weapons without needing a permit while also expanding people’s right to defend themselves both in public and private places. The elections law change would require people to show a government-issued photo ID at the polls starting in 2017, if voters also approve a proposed constitutional amendment on the November ballot.

Both measures passed with more than the required two-thirds majority in each chamber as Republicans shut off Democratic discussion and enacted the laws on largely party-line votes.

The 13 veto overrides in this session added to Nixon’s record of being the state’s most overridden governor.

… Heading into Wednesday, lawmakers had successfully overridden Nixon on 83 bills and budget expenditures over his two terms in office — nearly four times more overrides than the combined total for all other governors dating back to 1820 when Missouri was still a territory.

… The votes occurred as many lawmakers are campaigning for re-election in November.

… The measure, described by supporters as “constitutional carry,” allows people to carry hidden guns anywhere they can currently carry weapons openly, effective Jan. 1. People who choose to still get a concealed-carry permit could potentially carry their weapons into places off-limits to others and could take them to states with reciprocal agreements.

The legislation also would create a “stand-your-ground” right, meaning people don’t have a duty to retreat from danger any place they are legally entitled to be present. The NRA says 30 states have laws or court precedents stating people have no duty to retreat from a threat anywhere they are lawfully present. But Missouri’s measure makes it the first new “stand-your-ground” state since 2011.

… It also expands the “castle doctrine” by allowing invited guests such as baby sitters to use deadly force if confronted in homes.

And if the 2A legislation wasn’t enough of a win for conservatives, Voter ID has to be some spectacular icing on the cake.

… Missouri’s photo ID measure was opposed by the state NAACP, AARP and other advocates for minorities and the elderly. In a letter explaining his veto, Nixon said the measure would “disproportionately” impact senior citizens, people with disabilities and others who have been lawfully voting but don’t have the government-issued photo ID required under the bill.

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