Oh Great: 30,000 Refugees in Sweden Have “Gone Missing”

Swedish flag

How exactly do you lose 30,000 people? Especially in such a small country and under circumstances where the refugee population is presumably being monitored?

Zero Hedge reported:

30,000 Refugees “Go Missing” As Swedes Face Increasing Violence From Asylum-Seekers

The daily Svenska Dagbladet reported that 30,000 people whose asylum application had been rejected and were scheduled for deportation, had gone missing. The police say they lack the resources to track down these illegals.

Three Somali men in their 20s, who took turns raping a 14-year-old girl, received very lenient sentences — and all three avoided deportation.

On June 7, it was reported that British citizen Grace “Khadija” Dare had brought her 4-year-old son, Isa Dare, to live in Sweden, in order to benefit from free health care. In February, the boy was featured in an ISIS video, blowing up four prisoners in a car. The boy’s father, a jihadist with Swedish citizenship, was killed fighting for ISIS.

“If you disagree with the establishment, you are immediately called a racist or fascist, which we definitely are not. At times I felt that this was what it must have been like to live in the old Soviet Union.” — Karla, on why her family had left Sweden for Mallorca.

One Month of Islam and Multiculturalism in Sweden: June 2016

June 1: The Swedish National Council for Crime Prevention (Brå), released a report which showed that 11,007 people have been sentenced to deportation after being convicted of crimes. However, the report makes no mention of how many of these individuals have actually been deported. The number of convictions that include deportation has decreased, despite an increasing crime rate among foreigners in Sweden. In the 1970s, about 500 a year were sentenced to deportation; in 2004, the number had risen to 1,074, but in 2014 only 644 received this verdict.

Not only are fewer people sentenced to deportation — but more and more, those who are to be deported refuse to leave the country. In October of last year, daily newspaper Svenska Dagbladet reported that 30,000 people whose asylum application had been rejected and were scheduled for deportation, had gone missing. The police say they lack the resources to track down these illegals. Patrik Engström, head of the border police at the Department of National Operations (NOA), told the paper: “We put these people on the wanted list, but we do not engage in an active search for them. We wait for tips and things like that.”

America is a much larger country than Sweden. How are we going to prevent something like this from happening?

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