WHOA: Police Raid Democrat-Run Indiana Group Over Voter Fraud Accusations

old voters

Accusations of voter fraud are popping up all over the place during this election. In Indiana, a group that registers voters just had their office raided after accusations that they committed forgery on some registrations.

The Indy Star reports:

Who’s behind group police say submitted fraudulent voter registration forms?

A so-called “dark money” group is at the center of a burgeoning controversy over possible voter registration fraud in Indiana.

Patriot Majority USA, a nonpartisan charitable organization that is allowed to keep its donors secret, is behind the Indiana Voter Registration Project, which came under scrutiny last week when IndyStar revealed that Indiana State Police are investigating the organization.

The group received more than $30 million in contributions in 2014, according to its most recent publicly available filings with the Internal Revenue Service. More than a quarter of that — $8.25 million — came from a single, undisclosed donor.

The man who runs the group, Democratic strategist Craig Varoga, is a former national staffer on President Bill Clinton’s 1996 campaign who led a successful independent expenditure campaign to re-elect then-Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid in 2010. He founded Patriot Majority USA in 2011 and also runs several affiliated groups funded primarily by labor unions.

The Intercept has more:

The state’s investigation into the IVRP went public in mid-September when Indiana’s Republican Secretary of State Connie Lawson announced that at least 10 of the group’s voter registration applications had been forged. In a letter referring to the IVRP that Lawson sent to elections administrators in all of the state’s 92 counties, she warned that “nefarious actors are operating here in Indiana,” and instructed them to “please contact the Indiana State Police Special Investigations” if they receive registration forms submitted by the liberal-backed group.

The group retorted that it had already submitted tens of thousands of registrations in Indiana this year and that by zeroing in on just a handful of problematic applications the state appeared to be criminalizing a basic feature of voter registration itself, which inevitably involves submitting paperwork that contains imperfections.

How many more fraudulent registrations are floating around out there?

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