Federal Court Rules Against Colorado For ‘Unconstitutional’ Actions Regarding Electoral College

Like many blue states, Colorado tried some funny business with their Electoral College votes after the 2016 election.

Now a federal court has called them out for it.

The Daily Wire reported:

MEUSER: Federal Court Deals Serious Blow To The National Popular Vote Interstate Compact

Trending: 2020 Democratic Candidates Angry About Being Fact-Checked By The Media

On Tuesday, the Denver-based U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit ruled that the Colorado secretary of state violated the Constitution when he removed an Electoral College delegate who had chosen to vote for John Kasich instead of Hillary Clinton. The secretary of state nullified the vote of the delegate and installed a new delegate who voted in accordance with the popular vote of the state of Colorado.

Michael Baca, a loyal Democratic voter, was elected as a delegate to the Electoral College in November 2016. By voting for Kasich instead of Hillary, Baca was attempting to be a part of a movement by Electoral College delegates across the country to pull away votes from both Trump and Hillary so as to send the election to the U.S. House of Representatives.

The Constitution provides that if no candidate receives 50% plus one vote (270 Electoral College votes), then the top three candidates in the Electoral College are to be presented to the House of Representatives and the House is to select the next president.

Baca’s plan was dependent upon other Republican Electoral College delegates also voting for Kasich. Trump received 304 Electoral College votes and, for the plan to succeed, 35 Republican delegates would have also had to cast their votes for Kasich.

While Kasich would not have received any votes in the general election, his third-place finish in the Electoral College would have made him eligible for the Republican-controlled House to elect him as president of the United States.

The left only hates the Electoral College now because of Trump’s 2016 win. You didn’t hear them complaining when Obama won the Electoral College twice.

It’s a vital institution.

The Washington Examiner reports:

Why the Electoral College is vital, not outdated

Abolishing the Electoral College was once an outrageous suggestion. But with 15 states and counting supporting an interstate agreement to grant their electoral votes to the winner of the popular vote for president, the idea is gaining traction nationwide.

Critics call the Electoral College outdated, and see it as an 18th-century relic. This is dead wrong: The Electoral College is vital to the American system of self-government.

1. It protects the liberty and role of diverse states.

The Constitution assigns states presidential electors in the same way it does representation in Congress — providing for popular participation while protecting the various constituencies, in this case the states, through which that consent is reflected. And that protects the diversity of interests and opinions in states, especially small rural ones in the face of large urban ones, whether it be socialism in Vermont or conservatism in Wyoming.

Democrats just want to change the rules to favor themselves.

You Might Like

 

Join the conversation!

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, profanity, vulgarity, doxing, or discourteous behavior. If a comment is spam, instead of replying to it please hover over that comment, click the ∨ icon, and mark it as spam. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain fruitful conversation.