Sandmann Defamation Case: Court Hears First Arguments In $250 Million Lawsuit

Nick Sandmann was smeared by the media for doing nothing, but his lawsuits are probably going to make him a very wealthy man.

His case just got its first hearing.

The Cincinnati Enquirer reports:

Nick Sandmann in court for first time in $250M defamation suit against Washington Post

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Nick Sandmann, a Covington Catholic student seeking more than three-quarters of $1 billion against several media companies, was in court for one of the pending lawsuits for the first time on Monday.

Sandmann sat in a blue suit between his lawyers, L. Lin Wood and Todd McMurtry, as arguments were heard in a federal courtroom in Covington.

Nick’s first defamation suit was filed against The Washington Post. He seeks $250 million for the paper’s coverage of a late-January incident on the Lincoln Memorial in which Sandmann and his classmates encountered a Native American group.

Judge William O. Bertelsman heard from Sandmann’s attorneys and those from The Washington Post, which has made a motion to dismiss the allegations against it. Bertelsman did not rule on the motion in court, saying he will review the arguments and reach a decision in the coming weeks.

McMurtry argued The Post reported on the incident before compiling enough facts about what happened between Nick and Nathan Phillips, the Native American man who stood across from Nick. Videos of the encounter went viral. Nick received death threats.

McMurtry said The Post’s reporting could lead a reasonable reader to conclude Nick’s actions were worthy of contempt. He added that the gist of The Post’s first article implied Nick assaulted Phillips.

Naturally, the Washington Post is trying to get the case dismissed.

WLTW News reports:

Washington Post wants $250 million defamation lawsuit by Covington Catholic High School student dismissed

In federal court, an attorney for Sandmann asked Judge William Bertelsman to deny efforts by the Washington Post to dismiss the lawsuit.

An attorney for the paper, Kevin Baine, defended the reports in question and argued Sandmann’s claims don’t rise to the level of defamation.

Bertelsman said he would issue a ruling in three to four weeks.

Afterward, Sandmann left the federal courthouse surrounded by his family.

Baine declined comment, but Wood didn’t hold back, sharing his views on the Post’s reports and about his 16-year-old client.

“Nicholas is going to live his whole life in fear that one day, when he least expects it, the false narrative is going to resurface, and he’s going to be accused all over again,” Wood said.

What the media did to these kids is unforgivable.

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